The Four Pillars of Laurent Fabius: what is needed for a Paris Climate deal

Published 09:32 on May 18, 2015  /  Last updated at 09:32 on May 18, 2015  /  Climate Talks, International  /  No Comments

France’s foreign minister Lauren Fabius has laid down his four essential elements needed for the global climate deal to be signed in Paris in December.

France’s foreign minister Lauren Fabius has laid down his four essential elements needed for the global climate deal to be signed in Paris in December.

In his opening speech to the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in Berlin on Monday, he outlined these four pillars:

1) A Paris alliance to hold temperature increases at 1.5C or 2C. This agreement should be differentiated, legally binding and sustainable. It should include several elements but Fabius mentioned one that he said is sometimes not referred to: adaptation.

“Many countries emit very little while suffering a great deal. Adaptation should be part of the answer.”

2) National contributions from all countries must be made before Oct. 30. He said they should include plans on adaptation, but added that it was very likely that these contributions won’t be enough for 1.5C or 2C so further means were necessary to scale that up.

“A growing number of countries want to set a long-term collective objective, 2050 for example, or a review clause to strengthen objectives or set new targets for future” for the Paris deal to become a sustainable agreement without commitments merely stopping in 2030.

 3) Finance to provide a complete means of implementation of national objectives. Developed nations have already agreed to provide $100 billion a year by 2020, including provisions for the Green Climate Fund.

“One has to be careful and say these measures should not replace measures taken by states, they should just come as an additional support.”

4) The Paris “Innovation” to log actions by all stakeholders to implement the agreement on the ground, including cities, regions, companies, civil society as well as governments.

“This is to insist companies, local authorities and others make commitments themselves. These should not replace government actions but provide additional support.”

 

By Ben Garside – ben@carbon-pulse.com