ANALYSIS: Peruvian dispute over REDD reference levels presages global offset supply uncertainty

Published 01:35 on April 21, 2021  /  Last updated at 16:36 on April 21, 2021  /  Africa, Americas, Asia Pacific, Canada, China, Climate Talks, EMEA, International, Kyoto Mechanisms, New Market Mechanisms, Other APAC, REDD, South & Central, US, Voluntary Market  /  4 Comments

Three indigenous organisations and nine REDD offset project developers have challenged Peru’s new forest emissions reference level (FREL), which they say reflects the preferences of donor nations and not realities on the ground in low-deforestation countries.

Three indigenous organisations and nine REDD offset project developers have challenged Peru’s new forest emissions reference level (FREL), which they say reflects the preferences of donor nations and not realities on the ground in low-deforestation countries.

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4 Comments

  1. Really great to see this in-depth reporting; I appreciate hearing the nuances from both the trend-based and historical average based points of view

  2. Good piece. REDD should be rewarded to help nations make changes and not punish them. The FRELs are not made for REDD credit. FRELs are indicators but contain a big story. Some see FRELs as caps. Anyway: efforts that is what REDD credits need to be for. More key is that a forest nation does not only have good projects but also good policies. So, heats next?

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