Turkey submits INDC for its emissions to rise 116% by 2030

Published 18:31 on September 30, 2015  /  Last updated at 14:47 on October 2, 2015  /  Climate Talks, EMEA, EU ETS, International, Kyoto Mechanisms, Middle East, New Market Mechanisms, Voluntary Market  /  No Comments

Turkey submitted its INDC on Wednesday for a 21% economy-wide emission cut under BAU by 2030, a goal that would allow its emissions to more than double over the next 15 years.

Turkey submitted its INDC on Wednesday for a 21% economy-wide emission cut under BAU by 2030, a goal that would allow its emissions to more than double over the next 15 years.

Turkey was one of the few remaining big emitting nations yet to enter its contribution to a UN climate pact.

The country is under pressure to rein in its spiralling emissions, which have more than doubled since 1990. During that time, GDP has risen 230% and energy demand has grown 6-7% annually.

The INDC would enable emissions to rise 116% from 2012 levels, compared to a 173% increase under BAU. Turkey said this would prevent some 246 million tonnes of CO2e from entering the atmosphere.

The plan would allow Turkey’s emissions to increase at an even faster rate to its growth over the preious ten years, according to Onder Algedik of environmental campaigners 350Ankara.

“Existing high carbon economy policies will be strengthened … climate friendly energy solutions are being postponed and limited,” he said, referring to its wind energy target to install 16 GW of capacity by 2030, versus a previous government plan for 20 GW by 2023.

The INDC outlined multiple targeted policies across all sectors, including increasing capacity for solar and wind power to 10GW and 16GW respectively, and said it hoped to make use of market-based mechanisms.

The INDC pointed out that despite soaring emissions, its GHG output per capita of 5.9 tonnes of CO2e is much lower than the EU and OECD average.

SPECIAL STATUS

Classed as an upper-middle income developing country, Turkey has a special status in the UNFCCC in that it is an Annex I country but unlike developed nations was not required to pledge an emission reduction target under the Kyoto Protocol.

This status meant it could not participate in either the CDM or JI mechanisms.

Turkey has for years talked about developing a domestic emissions trading scheme that will be fully compatible with the EU ETS to help its accession into the bloc.

The nation is a member of the PMR and has taken an interest in market mechanism in recent years, but so far the only market in which it has been able to participate is the voluntary (VER) market.

“Turkey aims to use carbon credits from international market mechanisms to achieve its 2030 mitigation target in a cost effective manner and in accordance with the relevant rules and standards,” the INDC said.

By Ben Garside – ben@carbon-pulse.com

 

 

Comment