INDC Roundup: Three more nations submit INDCs as climate summit looms

Published 20:05 on November 23, 2015  /  Last updated at 13:17 on July 5, 2017  /  Africa, Americas, Climate Talks, EMEA, International, Middle East, REDD, South & Central  /  No Comments

Cuba, South Sudan and Yemen submitted INDCs on Monday to take the total to 174 party pledges to the UN global climate pact, while Guyana resubmitted its pledge to include reference to its REDD+ mega deal with Norway.

Cuba, South Sudan and Yemen submitted INDCs on Monday to take the total to 174 party pledges to the UN global climate pact, while Guyana resubmitted its pledge to include reference to its REDD+ mega deal with Norway.

Cuba – The Caribbean nation pledged no targets to reduce its emissions, which were 40 million tonnes in 2010, but it flagged plans to build biomass-fired power plants to be fuelled by sugar cane and wood, 13 wind farms and 74 small hydroelectric plants. These would cost $4 billion and need to be partly financed with international support.

Cuba said the economic blockade with the US has imposed “serious difficulties” on its abilities to develop sustainably. It did not mention markets, but it is part of the ALBA negotiating bloc of countries that has been sceptical of such mechanisms.

South Sudan – Formed in 2011, the world’s newest nation pledged to undertake a GHG inventory in 2016 to help it assess BAU emissions, with the impacts of policies on that level to be presented later.

Among the policies listed are measures to increase the use of clean energy including a new hydropower plant, and burn wood and charcoal more efficiently. It has also declared 20% of its natural forests as protected reserves, and will plant 20 million trees over 10 years. In transport, it vowed to establish a vehicle emission standard. It made no mention of markets.

Yemen – Proposes a 14% cut on 2030 BAU, which would save about 35 million tonnes of CO2e. Yemen emits around 33 million tonnes of CO2e a year currently.

1% of the 14% goal is unconditional and involves investing in wind and gas power, installing solar panels on public buildings, and improving access to energy in rural areas. Its conditional measures included two additional gas-fired power plants and an expansion of renewable electricity to cover 15% of the generation mix in 2025 via wind and geothermal plants.

GUYANA REMEMBERS NORWAY

Guyana submitted a revised INDC, which included the following on its proposed use of markets:

“Outside our bilateral agreement with Norway, Guyana does not currently see viable opportunities in carbon trading markets; however this does not preclude participation in green consumer markets at all levels. Guyana’s robust MRV system can ensure the integrity of our emission reduction efforts as we engage with carbon-neutral markets as a means of maximizing the value of our exports and providing internationally attractive, verifiable low carbon products.”

The original pledge made no mention in its markets section of the Norway REDD+ agreement, for which the Norwegian government has pledged to pay up to $250 million to protect its forest.

WHO IS LEFT?

After Iran’s submission on Sunday, the major polluters yet to submit an INDC are Malaysia, Nigeria and Venezuela.

**Click here to see Carbon Pulse’s INDC Tracker**

By Ben Garside – ben@carbon-pulse.com

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