Alberta Premier to back nationwide carbon price floor -reports

Published 03:15 on March 2, 2016  /  Last updated at 08:44 on March 2, 2016  /  Americas, Canada  /  No Comments

The premier of Canada’s biggest-emitting province will back a nationwide carbon price floor when premiers meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau later this week, but only as long as the revenue stays in the province it is raised.

The premier of Canada’s biggest-emitting province will back a nationwide carbon price floor when premiers meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau later this week, but only as long as the revenue stays in the province it is raised.

Trudeau will press ahead with a plan for a C$15 or more minimum price on carbon emissions across the nation when he meets with regional leaders in Vancouver Thursday.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley on Tuesday came out in support of Trudeau’s plan, but stressed that revenues must stay in the provinces rather than go in federal coffers.

“Canada must step up into a new and better role as one of the world’s most environmentally progressive economies and one of the world’s most environmentally progressive energy producers,” Notley said according to the Calgary Herald.

Last November she outlined a plan to introduce an economy-wide CO2 tax starting at C$20 per tonne in 2017 and rising to C$30 the following year. The Alberta government expects to raise some C$3 billion annually from it.

Notley’s support will be welcome for the PM, after Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall this week reiterated his opposition against the tax.

“The very last thing we need right now is another new tax,” he said Monday, according to the Financial Post.

Yukon Premier Darrell Pasloski has previously said he is against the plan.

The fierce opposition in some corners means the outcome of Thursday’s meeting remains highly uncertain, and Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger – who announced in December his province’s plan to launch an ETS – on Wednesday told the Winnipeg Free Press he doubted Trudeau would be able to push the plan through.

“Some of the folks in the cap-and-trade provinces don’t want an imposition from the feds, and some of the folks in the north say they are paying enough already,” he said.

By Stian Reklev – stian@carbon-pulse.com

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